Many workers depending on taxis arrived late at work

Many commuters had to find alternative ways to get to work due to the taxi protest.

The national taxi strike on Wednesday morning, 8 November, forced many workers who depend on taxis to arrive late at work, but it also affected Grade 12 learners who are writing their final exams.

Although the strike took place in Pretoria, many taxi drivers operating in Krugersdorp joined their counterparts as the taxi industry as a whole is dissatisfied with the operating licences granted to the bus rapid transport system, and the public transport subsidies.

One of the few taxi drivers who was on duty spoke to the News, but asked not to be named. He said the government ignores their needs as taxi drivers. “Our jobs are very important but no one in government takes our complaints seriously, and we’re expected to adhere to every law, like other workers,” he said.

Also Read: National taxi strike to hit the West Rand

Weekday taxi commuter, Marcia Mabona, said the protest seriously disrupted her morning – first, she had to arrange transport for her daughter, who is in Grade 12.

“Then I had to call my employer, as I was already 45 minutes late for work and still standing in the queue,” said Marcia.

And despite a queue marshall saying that everything should be back to normal by the afternoon rush hour, many commuters had to wait longer than usual for transport to get themselves home.

Do you perhaps have more information pertaining to this story? Email us at krugersdorpnews@caxton.co.za or phone us on 011 955 1130.

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Randfontein Herald

Roodepoort Record

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  AUTHOR
Bathabile Msomi
Intern

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